Survey Says…

Business woman at work

Many of our clients use surveys to help them understand part of their customers’ experiences. Typically, these surveys include sections that ask about different functional areas within the company – product development, service and support, account or sales teams, etc. Within each of these sections, we ask specific attribute questions to gain more context. For […]

How Will Incentives Affect My Response Rates?

Counting dollars bribe

Offering market research incentives can be a major boon to response rates, getting you more completions more quickly. And the good news is that “almost all studies that have evaluated the effect of incentives on quality of response have found no effects”(1). However, before committing administrative and financial resources to market research incentives, understanding how […]

Report Survey Results without Parroting the Questionnaire

pappagallo

When you analyze and report survey results, focus on the story you want to tell – don’t assume the questionnaire’s structure is the best for analysis. A properly designed questionnaire provides a narrative thread that conversationally moves the respondent from one question to—if possible—another closely related question, abruptly changing topics as few times as necessary. […]

Use Multiple Text Boxes for More Productive Respondents

Novelist writing a book on a typewriter

A perennial problem with open-ended survey questions is that respondents are lazy. It takes time and effort to think of good answers. And if the survey is self-administered online or on paper, it takes time and effort to write them out. But there are several things a savvy researcher can do. One of them is […]

How To Monitor the Quality of Respondent Answers

"inspected by 11"

On March 19, 2015, the esteemed Annie Pettit of Peanut Labs led us through a brief but insightful presentation on data quality lessons from the survey design perspective. As researchers who are actively engaged in survey implementation, we want to ensure that the responses we are collecting are as accurate as possible. This requires a […]

How to Design Killer Surveys

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Perhaps the most important element in running a successful survey is also the most overlooked: the cognitive stress load the survey places on respondents. While much is said about proper methods of sampling, delivery, and follow-up, minimizing respondents’ cognitive stress with well-written, well-designed surveys is in fact one of the most effective ways to improve […]

An Inconvenient Truth about Convenience Samples

Darts missing the bullseye

A convenience sample is simply any list, panel, or source of potential respondents. At Researchscape, we do lots of surveys of convenience samples. Because, of course, they’re convenient. Also, cheap. We use house lists of emails of prospects, customers, and lapsed customers – no cost for these, with the caveat they present a skewed view […]

Non-Traditional Paid Respondents More Tech-Savvy than Panelists

Tokyo crowds coming together in two crosswalks

On March 5, 2015, Survey Magazine presented the TrueSample semi-annual quality council meeting. The speakers were Chuck Miller and Mark Menig, reviewing findings from several research-on-research initiatives. The quality council is now in its seventh year. Traditional sampling versus non-traditional sampling was the first topic of the day. The goal here was to assess differences […]

Reducing Cognitive Stress on Survey Respondents

PET scan of a normal brain

Data quality is directly proportional to comprehension and usability Challenge When it comes to survey and attitudinal behavior research, representative sampling and random probability sampling theory is often discussed; however, a simpler quality factor has long been overlooked: The ‘cognitive stress’ the surveys place on respondents. Cognitive stress measures the internal apprehension and anxiety humans […]

The Gedrankenexperiment

craft microbrew beers are in a sampler tray at a brewery

As we did last year, all through January, we featured some “Lost Gems” from 2014 — some great posts that deserved to get wider notice than they did the first time out. Here’s the last in this series. As market researchers we like to classify people and in particular we like to classify how people […]