Implicit vs. Explicit Techniques in Market Research

digital illustration of neurons

Each day we’re counting down our Top 12 blog posts of 2014. Coming in at #1 is this article originally published June 27! I can hear Cher’s beautiful bellow on the remake version now…”if you want to know, if he loves you so, it’s in his kiss…whoa, yeah, it’s in his kiss!” Try to ignore […]

Do Timed Judgments of Associations Count as Implicit Research?

stopwatch in hand

I recently came across a technique that was described as modeling “neural networks” by measuring the strength of associations between attributes and brands through response latency techniques. It sounds fancy and has the sniff of scientific validity rising from the reference to neural networks and response latency, so I took a closer look. The technique […]

The Mere Exposure Effect: Advertising to the Subconscious

Wayne's World screen capture

A recent Adweek column bemoaned the absence of brand names from the first 29 seconds of many 30-second ads. It advised introducing the brand earlier and mentioning it more often, as the author explained that otherwise people forget the name of the brand. The author offered the right advice but for the wrong reasons. He […]

Conscious or Unconscious, That Is The Question

David Tennant as Hamlet with the skull of Andre Tchaikovsky as Yorick

Most marketing research relies on assessing consumers’ conscious reactions to marketing ideas, ads, commercials, etc., through questionnaires, surveys, and focus groups. It also often relies on evidence that the message was attended to by assessing recall of ad content. But market researchers make several faulty assumptions in taking this approach. One assumption is that respondents […]

Advantages of Neuroscience Market Research

Market researchers have known for decades what new technology has been demonstrating relatively recently: that human beings are not fully aware of all the influences at work on them and that they often misreport what they have witnessed. Many biases including social pressure and convention may alter a respondent’s reactions and provide incentives for respondents […]

From Dead Salmon to the Dot-com Bubble

Salmon head close up isolated on white

What’s the difference between a dead salmon and a scientist? Apparently not much, if you’re scanning their brains. Craig Bennett, a post doctorate student in cognitive neuroscience at the University of California, Santa Barbara, simply wanted to conduct test runs on an fMRI brain scanner in 2009 to confirm some settings and calibrate the machine. […]