Market Research Jobs are Changing

Market Research Jobs are Changing

Market research jobs are changing.

Gone are the days when you attended business school with a major in marketing, or got a Master’s degree in statistics, psychology or econometrics.

Gone are the days when you had formal training, on the job or off.

Gone are the days when Fortune 1000 companies employed people for decades.

Yes, market research jobs are changing.

Gone are the days when companies invested in a market research department, nurtured it, relied on it and supported it.

Gone are the days when young researchers were planfully rotated among various market research functions within their company.

Gone are the days when young researchers had career-long mentors.

Market research jobs are changing.

Gone are the days when huge companies wouldn’t think of entrusting market research to someone right out of college.

Gone are the days when market research was a career, not a way-station.

Gone are the days when you could spend an entire career without being inundated by vast amounts of data.

Market research jobs are changing.

Gone are the days when understanding market research meant simply understanding surveys and focus groups.

Gone are the days when it was good enough to simply be a solid research consultant.

Gone are the days when a research consultant could grow a business simply based on word-of-mouth.

Market research jobs are changing.

Gone are the days when there were only a few trusted sample vendors.

Gone are the days when there were only a few trusted technology vendors.

Gone are the days when methodological choices were fairly easy.

Market research jobs are changing.

Gone are the days when there were just a few events on the market research conference circuit.

Gone are the days when the competition was known, both organizationally and personally.

Gone are the days when the coming years were predictable.

Market research jobs are changing.

Sure, there are exceptions to each of these rules. But in the world of market research, change itself is the new defining rule.

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About Dana Stanley

Dana is the Editor-in-Chief of Research Access.

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