Think Beyond iPad for Tablet Surveys

OSLogosResearchers, when you read about companies equipping their employees with iPads, I know you’re dreaming about beautiful, feature-rich, touch-based surveys for the B2B market.  In fact, this type of tablet-based survey is already being done today by the likes of SurveyPocket and others.

You need to start thinking beyond just the iPad, though.  The corporate market for tablets is up for grabs, according to a report by the Financial Times.

The report notes recent research by the NPD group indicating that 68% of company-supplied tablets are iPads.  However, it indicated that companies are taking a “wait-and-see” attitude when it comes to tablets, with Android presenting some security concerns, and with Microsoft not having yet launched its Windows 8 product, which is expected to be touch- and app-friendly.

The stakes couldn’t be higher. iPad has the first-mover advantage, but the market is growing fast.

Globally in Q4 2011 the tablet market grew dramatically; iPad’s market share was still dominant at 57%, but that figure was down from 64% in the prior quarter.

In addition to security and functionality, price has got to be a big factor moving forward.  I’ve got to believe that corporate purchasing departments will take notice of the iPad’s price tag, which is approximately double those of its competitors.

I have an iPad and am a huge fan of Apple products.  But double the price is a huge hurdle to overcome, especially in the corporate budgeting environment.

Sorry to make your job more complicated, but you need to start testing your tablet surveys on more than just the iPad.  To complete your survey coverage, you need to be thinking about Android, Blackberry and Windows.

Related posts:

  1. Game Over. Let the Tablet Surveys Begin.
  2. Ten ways the iPad will radically change market research
  3. Are iPads and Tablets redefining enterprise productivity?
  4. Paper Surveys are Finally Dead
  5. iPads! Get Yer iPads Here!
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About Dana Stanley

Dana is the Editor-in-Chief of Research Access.