Mobility is Evolution. Not Revolution.

By far, our most discussed topic over the past few months has been mobility. As the number of connected mobile devices (phones, tablets, netbooks, etc.) increases, more and more takes place on the go. Communication, commerce, education, and of course, research!

But in a recent article for TechNet Magazine by Research Access contributor Romi Mahajan, Romi makes the point that in so many ways, these changes are evolutionary, not revolutionary. (His point was in the context of the IT industry, but I think it holds true for us in research as well.) Here’s what he had to say:

Mobile computing devices, slate technologies, the near-ubiquity of wireless networks and a slew of innovative products and services enabled by the Internet have ushered huge changes in the way people live, work and interact. Some argue that these changes are tectonic—that they’ve created a fundamental rupture from which there’s “no going back.”

While it’s undoubtedly true that some of these changes are tectonic, it’s incumbent upon us to understand that these mobility-engendered changes are in many ways evolutionary—not revolutionary. IT has played a proactive, progressive and leading role in this evolution, not only because of heroic efforts, but because this evolution is built into the fabric of the profession.

What’s the takeaway? Mobility changes a lot, but we’re not starting from scratch. Mobility is simply the next step – for many industries – in what has been a continuously evolving cycle of innovation and improvement. It’s important to embrace it, but also equally important to not forget the lessons and practices learned along the way.

Read Romi’s article in full in the most recent issue of TechNet Magazine.

Advertisement
About Joshua Hoffman

Joshua Hoffman is Technology Specialist at Microsoft and a frequent contributor to Research Access.

Trackbacks

  1. […] mobile. Whether the interest in mobile technology indicates a revolution or merely an evolution[2] in market research methodology, there is much being written on the topic as firms consider whether […]

  2. […] mobile. Whether the interest in mobile technology indicates a revolution or merely an evolution[2] in market research methodology, there is much being written on the topic as firms consider whether […]

Speak Your Mind

*